Civil Rights Activist Todd Endo Remembers Selma

Suzanne Kai

January 19, 2015

 

Bloody Sunday-Alabama police attackJournalist Emil Guillermo features 1965 Selma voting rights protest march eyewitness Todd Endo, 74, on NBC News/Asian America today, Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Click here to read and view Emil's feature on Todd Endo.

 

2015 marks the 50th anniversary year of the three voting rights protest marches, from March 7 - 26, 1965 to walk the 54-mile highway from Selma to Montgomery, the capital of Alabama. 

Todd Endo's memories of the 1965 voting rights marches still haunt him to this day. A 24 year old graduate student at Harvard and a community church organizer, he learned on March 9, 1965 that his acquaintance Jim Reeb, a white Unitarian minister had traveled from the Boston area to Selma and was killed by white segregationists. Endlo decided to join a group from the Boston area and head to Selma.

Endo has spent his life working to reform education, desegregate schools, teach disadvantaged students, and help as an organizer in immigrant communities. He spent the first three years of his life with his family in a World War II Japanese American internment camp in Arkansas.