Spotlight

  • Happy Birthday Cameron Crowe!

    Posted by Suzanne Kai

    July 13, 2017 Happy Birthday Cameron Crowe! Thank you Cameron for sharing your amazing stories working with Ben Fong-Torres, your first editor at Rolling Stone for our documentary! The true life story behind "Almost Famous"! We've been working on a feature documentary film about the incredible life and times of Ben Fong-Torres, Rolling Stone magazine's first music editor. Both Ben and...

Editor's Choice Articles

  • Takuma Sato wins IndyCar series race - first Japanese driver in history to win

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    Takuma Sato is the first Japanese driver in history to win an IndyCar series race

    Long Beach

    April 21, 2013

    Takuma Sato, 36, is the first Japanese driver in history to win an IndyCar series race.

    Sato, won the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach for the team of legendary racer A.J. Foyt.

    This was the team's first victory in more than a decade.

    Sato came close to winning his first IndyCar race at last year's Indianapolis 500 but when he tried to pass Dario Franchitti on the final lap he spun out. For the full story click here. 

  • Feeling Stressed, and Wanting More Time? By Marilyn Tam “How did it get so late so soon?” - Dr. Seuss

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    Feeling Stressed, and Wanting More Time? By Marilyn Tam 

    “How did it get so late so soon?” - Dr. Seuss “It’s November already, where did the year go?”

    “The holidays are coming, and I’m still caught up in projects that I started months ago.” “Get all my work done? If I had 48 hours in a day I may get caught up in another year. Do you relate? Occasionally or more often, everyone has felt that time was rushing by, carrying with it our chances to finish what we began, say sorry, or redo something that we wish we hadn’t done.

    When the days are so packed with demands, both assigned and self-imposed, we have a tendency to live in a constant mad rush. Many of us multi-task and juggle urgent projects daily, careening through life with little time to ask why and what are we really doing. Later, sometimes too late, we realize that in our scramble through life, we have neglected what was truly meaningful to us.

    I’ve been there and more than a few times; living like that is an unsustainable and unhappy way to live. If you are feeling too stressed with what seems like an endless to do list, slow down. Take a deep breath, and then take another one, and then say, “What would happen if I didn’t do this task at this very moment?  What is really most important?  What is the truth here for me? Pull yourself back enough to get distance and perspective. Listen to the voice of your inner wisdom. The right answer to what you really need to do now will come.

    If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over? ~ John Wooden

    Many years ago, when I was working my way through college, I thought I could do it all. I was taking 24 credit hours of classes (normal load is 12-15), working 20 hours a week as a fast food fry cook, on the University’s swim team and I was also the main volunteer cook at the University’s Chinese American Club. Surprising probably to no one but me, I fell ill, seriously sick.

    Frustrated and unbelieving...

  • You Are Good Enough by Marilyn Tam

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    You Are Good Enough

    By Marilyn Tam

     

    They cannot take away our self-respect if we do not give it to them. 

     ~Mahatma Gandhi

     

                Are you good enough? Most people harbor feelings that somehow if people really knew who they are, they will not like them. This nagging feeling buzzes in the brain like small yet powerfully irritating mosquitoes, ready to sting at any moment, undermining our confidence to claim our rightful place at the table. This sense of insecurity can be negatively self-fulfilling and very destructive because it robs us of the confidence and courage to forge ahead on achieving our dreams. The choice to change is in our own hands.

                Being an unwanted child I was told from as early as I can recall that I was worthless, not a good start to building self-esteem. Yet eventually I learned to trust my inner knowing that each person is worthwhile just as they are. Self-respect gave me the strength and resilience to leave home in my mid teens and come to America, and to succeed in business, humanitarian work and in life.  How did that happen? I was blessed along the way with angels who told me that I was OK. We all have those angels in our lives when we look for them.

                My first angel was my grandfather who gave me my Chinese name, Hay Lit, the names of two powerful emperors in China’s history. One emperor was respected for his compassion and wisdom in governance and the other known for his prowess and strategy in war. It was a most unusual name for a girl, but for some unknown reason my grandfather chose this remarkable name for his third granddaughter. He died when I was seven so I never had the chance to ask him why. But the fact that someone thought I was worthy of such a legendary name fortified me when the outside world was telling me I was trash.

                You too have your own angel(s), who believe in you, whether it is a family member, a teacher, a spiritual figure or friend. Keep their support in your...

  • Are You Truly Free? by Marilyn Tam

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    Are You Truly Free?

    By Marilyn Tam 

    
“In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.” ~Franklin D. Roosevelt

          

          We are fortunate that we in the USA can enjoy basic freedom as a given. The things that bind us are more internal – the mental restrictions and “shoulds” that shape our thinking and our decisions subconsciously.

          These subconscious constraints confine us to a fixed set of expectations and view of the world.

           It locks us from truly being able to soar to our highest potential, inner peace and happiness. How can we break free? This is a three-step process. First by recognizing that we are prisoners of our beliefs.

    Whatever we believe about ourselves and the world is what we are going to experience. If you are holding negative thoughts like, “I’m not good enough” or “Bad things happen to me”, then that is what you are going to create in at least some aspects of your life.

           No one consciously choose to hold limiting beliefs, and yet we all do to some extent. Our childhood conditioning, whether from family, school, other influential figures in our lives, or the mass media, often contain some negative programming. People’s intentions may have been good, but fear and limitation are commonly used to keep young, rambunctious and questioning children, and indeed all people, in line. We often take on the constraints set for us as a children, to keep us from achieving our full potential later on in our lives.

           The second step is to examine your beliefs. Is it really true that you are only good at math, and/or that you can’t sing? Oftentimes we gather evidence to support these old convictions. You may say to yourself, I truly am only good at this one thing; I can’t carry a tune, or whatever. You have adopted these negative thought patterns and hang on to the indications that “prove” them. Yet we all have the potential to develop the skills or talents in areas that we are...

  • To Lie or Not to Lie by Marilyn Tam

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    Marilyn having tea

     

    TO LIE OR NOT TO LIE 

    By Marilyn Tam

     

    Scott Thompson, the four months old CEO of Yahoo, was forced to resign because he lied on his resume. Worse, he lied about his lying and was found out. He denied that he inserted an extra degree into his resume, and then he blamed the recruiting firm he worked with for doing so. The recruiting firm, wanting to maintain their reputation, showed that it was Mr. Thompson who lied. Net result is that Mr. Thompson now has much more time to contemplate the efficacy of lying. 

                The question is, what are we willing to tolerate in our leaders’ behavior and reflectively in our own? Lying is bad. We’ve been told that ever since we were little. Or have we? Haven’t we also been told, “don’t say that, it will make them feel bad”, and there are such things as “white lies”, as compared to I guess black lies, which are bad.

                So we have grown up with some sense of expediency in what we call lying. Why do people lie? Is it because there is a perception that one can get ahead faster by lying than by telling the truth? Why would someone who is already well credentialed and respected feel the need to embellish his or her story? Is it a basic human nature to try to appear more than we are?

                Insecurities and fear that we are not as good or confident as we may appear to the world is a common trait. Almost everyone have self-doubts. Many years ago in a quote that is oft repeated, Sally Fields upon receiving her second Oscar in five years burst out saying, “I can't deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!” It shows that even performers who are on top of their game harbor great anxiety about their worthiness.

                The way to deal with the uncertainty is to own that it is part of you and continue to forge ahead. Over the years as I climbed the proverbial corporate ladder I’ve had many occasions to witness self-serving lies from people in power. I also was there to...

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