Lifestyle Spotlight

  • Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave

    Posted by Admin

    If you know Rain, BoA (shown left), and Sistar, then you already know K-Pop, Korea’s contemporary pop music and its artists. K-Pop music is one of the fastest growing music genres in the world, and along with Korea’s popular TV drama serials, films and comic books are a growing source of export revenue for Korea.   The growing global fan base of Korea's entertainment and...

Lifestyle Articles

  • AAPI Group Outraged at Acquittal and Lenient Sentence for Sgt. Holcomb charged in the hazing and death of Pvt Danny Chen

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    July 31, 2012

    Its not over yet folks. Six more trials and one more sentencing remain. 

    Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55.

    Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

    Asian American Civil Rights Groups Angered by Acquittal and Lenient Sentence in Military Hazing Case

    FORT BRAGG, N.C.—Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55. Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

    “The verdict and sentencing recommendation in this case fly in the face of civil and human rights. It is absolutely appalling that following a campaign of humiliation due to anti-Asian bias by Sgt. Holcomb and others that led to...

  • AAPI Groups Urge Passage of Proposition 29 - California Cancer Research Act

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    June 1, 2012 - Press Release 

    Elected Officials, Health Advocates & Community Leaders Denounce

    Tobacco Company Lies About Prop. 29 & Urge AAPIs To Vote On Election Day

     

    San Gabriel, CA – Asian American & Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (AANHPI) elected officials, community leaders, & health advocates convened a press conference to urge AANHPI voters to ignore misleading ads funded by the tobacco industry & vote for Prop. 29, the California Cancer Research Act, on June 5th, 2012. Advocates countered the misleading claims by the tobacco industry with the following facts:

     

    The new $1 tobacco tax will save 104,000 lives; stop 228,000 kids from smoking; and generate approximately $735 million every year to support life-saving research and tobacco prevention programs. Prop. 29 will only increase taxes on those who smoke. The $1-per-pack increase is projected to prevent 225,000 Californian kids from becoming addicted smokers and prevent over 104,000 premature smoking-caused deaths, because many current smokers will quit.

    Prop. 29 will reduce state healthcare costs and spur economic growth. By driving down smoking rates, Prop 29 is projected to save $5.1 billion in smoking-caused healthcare costs funded by the state. By injecting tobacco revenue into California’s bio-science industry, Prop 29 is projected to create 12,000 new jobs and $1.9 billion in new economic activity. Prop 29’s language is clear: tobacco tax revenue must be spent in California. Section Two of the Act states: “Grants and loans for biomedical epidemiological, behavioral, health services and other research IN CALIFORNIA..." Section Two states: "Creation, staffing and equipping of CALIFORNIA research facilities…" 9 experts in the field of bio-science will be appointed to decide how cancer research funds can be most effectively used to beat cancer. Prop 29 has tough public annual audits and criminal penalties for misuse of funds to ensure that every dollar is spent...

  • KABC-TV's David Ono's "Witness: The Power of a Picture" 40th Anniversary of "Napalm Girl"

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    Witness:  The Power of a Picture

    A David Ono - ABC7 Eyewitness News Special

    KABC-TV Los Angeles

     

    Travel with ABC7 Eyewitness News Anchor, David Ono to Vietnam on the 40th Anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize winning photo “Napalm Girl” which shows an innocent 9-year-old whose clothes were burned off her body by napalm during the Vietnam War.

     

    Airing Saturday, June 2, at 6:30 p.m. PST

     

     

    Highlights of David Ono's powerful documentary are online at KABC-TV's website. The documentary initially aired on KABC-TV June 2, at 630 p.m. PST. 

    A photograph allows us to deeply examine a split second in time.  It’s an opportunity to freeze the world and absorb all the emotions, actions, consequences that are attached to that moment.     Photographer Nick Ut’s “Napalm Girl” did exactly that.  We saw an innocent child whose clothes were burned off her body, running naked, in seething pain.  Children, caught in the cross fire, would forever have an indelible face - Kim Phuc.  That moment changed us, providing a sobering clarity to how quickly innocent life can be shattered by war.  KABC-TV's David Ono travels back to Trang Bang, where, 40 years ago, a 21 year old photographer and a 9 year old girl collide to create one of the most important images of the 20th century.  It’s the story of Kim Phuc, Nick Ut and others who are helping to open the world’s eyes to the realities of war.        Related:

    ABC7 has aired these related stories which are viewable online:

    Vietnam War photographer Nick Ut recalls Pulitzer Prize-winning shot of girl running from napalm strike Kim Phuc, ‘Napalm Girl’ in iconic Vietnam War photo, discusses life-changing moment
  • Supporters urging passage of H.R. 5638 "Service Member Anti-Hazing Act" head to Washington with 9000 cards honoring U.S. Army Pvt. Danny Chen

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    Update May 28, 2012

    May 24, 2012 would have been Private Danny Chen's 20th birthday. 

    After weeks of hazing, physical and mental abuse and racial taunting as documented in his personal diary, U.S. Army Private Danny Chen was found dead of an apparent suicide on October 3, 2011 in Afghanistan. 

    More than 9,000 cards honoring bullying victim Danny Chen have been collected and are on their way to Washington D.C. by supporters of anti-bullying legislation of H.R. 5638, the "Service Member Anti-Hazing Act." The bill has passed the House on Friday, May 25, and now waits for Senate approval. 

     

    Update April 11, 2012

    Army Courts-Martial in Connection with U.S. Private Danny Chen Moved to US

    The U.S. military announced today that the trials of the eight U.S. soldiers implicated in the death of 19 year old U.S. Army Private Danny Chen have been moved to U.S. soil. The trials will be held at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, if senior military officials decide courts-martial are warranted. Fort Bragg's commanders have accepted jurisdiction in the case.

    A miliary investigator has recommended courts-martial for all of the soldiers.

    "We are relieved and pleased," said Elizabeth R. OuYang, president of the New York chapter of civil rights group Organization of Chinese Americans (OCA), which has been lobbying the military for a change in jurisdiction to the United States, rather than in Afghanistan.  

    Chen's relatives say he was subjugated to brutal hazing before he apparently committed suicide Oct. 3, 2011. Investigators are reviewing allegations that Chen was subjected to weeks of physical abuse, humilation and racial slurs by members of his unit in Afghanistan before he apparently killed himself.

    A nationwide grass-roots campaign has raised awareness of Private Danny Chen's case. 

    In a separate case, on October 27, 2011 several Marines were ordered to face court-martial on charges they physically abused and humiliated fellow Marine, 21 year old Asian American...

  • Harvard's Prof. Miaki Ishii - Startling discoveries of Earth's inner core

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    Harvard Assoc. Prof. Miaki Ishii - Photo Harvard Seismology Group

    May 28 2012

    Harvard Associate Professor Miaki Ishii and her colleagues at Harvard University are studying Earth's inner core, approximately 1,800 miles beneath the surface. The research using seismic data is making waves in the scientific community and beyond.

    New York Times writer Natalie Anger reports. (The New York Times online offers a digital subscription service, you may need to sign up to view this report.)