Business Spotlight

  • Hallyu: Riding the Korean Wave

    Posted by AC Team

    If you know Rain, BoA (shown left), and Sistar, then you already know K-Pop, Korea’s contemporary pop music and its artists. K-Pop music is one of the fastest growing music genres in the world, and along with Korea’s popular TV drama serials, films and comic books are a growing source of export revenue for Korea.   The growing global fan base of Korea's entertainment and...

Business Articles

  • Photos: AALDEF Honors Congressman John Lewis, Jose Antonio Vargas, and Simone Wu with 2013 Justice in Action Awards

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    Congressman John Lewis (GA), Margaret Fung, AALDEF Exec Dr, BD Wong, Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, Simone Wu of Choice Hotels Intl, Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer Columbia Univ., Juju Chang ABC News, at AALDEF awards Photo by Lia Chang

    New York City

    Congressman John Lewis, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives (Georgia), Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, and Simone Wu of Choice Hotels International, Inc. received the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund’s (AALDEF) 2013 Justice in Action Awards at AALDEF’s annual Lunar New Year benefit, held at PIER 60 Chelsea Piers in New York on February 19, 2013.

    2013 AALDEF Justice in Action honorees Jose Antonio Vargas, Simone Wu and Congressman John Lewis. Photo by Lia Chang

    Since 1987, AALDEF has presented the Justice in Action Awards to exceptional individuals for their outstanding achievements and efforts in advancing social justice. The awards were presented by Rep. Grace Meng, the first Asian American to represent New York in Congress, Tony Award-winning playwright of M. Butterfly David Henry Hwang, and Gordon Smith, CEO of Consumer and Community Banking, JPMorgan Chase.

    Congressman John Lewis, Member of the U.S. House of Representatives (Georgia), Margaret Fung, AALDEF executive director, BD Wong, Jose Antonio Vargas of Define American, and Simone Wu of Choice Hotels International, Inc., Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer at Columbia University and Juju Chang, Emmy Award-winning correspondent for ABC News Nightline at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund’s (AALDEF) 2013 Justice in Action Awards held at PIER 60 Chelsea Piers in New York on February 19, 2013. Photo by Lia Chang

    Juju Chang, Emmy Award-winning correspondent for ABC News Nightline, and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer at Columbia University, both long time supporters of AALDEF, were the co-emcees for the banquet of over 700. They were joined at the end with a surprise appearance on stage from actor BD Wong, who urged the guests to show their support for AALDEF.

    Co-emcees Juju Chang, Emmy Award-winning correspondent for ABC News Nightline, and Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer at Columbia University raise their...

  • Kevin Tsujihara named Warner Bros Studios CEO

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    Kevin Tsujihara, Warner Bros. CEO Photo: WB

    January 29, 2013

    Kevin Tsujihara, Warner Bros. CEO Congratulations!

    Tsujihara, 48, the twenty year Warner Bros veteran was named CEO on Monday and is expected to take over the post March 1. 

    He has been president of Warner Bros. Home Entertainment since its founding October, 2005. He has managed the studio's DVD business, as well as a range of responsibilities outside of the television and movie business helmed by other divisions, from games acquisitions and content distribution via VOD and other digital platforms.  

    Tsujihara received his BA in business administration from Universiaty of Southern California, and an MBA from Stanford University.

    Its been reported in the news media that Tsujihara has a humble and low-key management style, and was considered a "Black Sheep" of the list of likely candidates for the CEO post. Current chairman Barry Meyer, told LATimes.com "Everyone needs a leader, and Kevin was the best equipped to unify the company at this time." We just thought he was the best for the whole company."

    He is the son of chicken farmers in Petaluma, California, and grandson of Japanese immigrants. When he becomes CEO on March 1, he will be the fifth CEO in Warner Bros. 90 year history, and the first Asian American to run a major Hollywood studio.

  • In Memoriam: Senator Daniel Inouye 1924-2012

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    December 17, 2012

    American war hero and distinguished Senator Daniel Inouye has died at the age of 88 of respiratory complications at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

    "Tonight, our country has lost a true American hero," said President Barack Obama. Senator Inouye was the second longest serving senator in the U.S. and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his World War II heroics.

    He was a member of the U.S. Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the most decorated unit in U.S. history. 

    For the full story click here

  • AAPI Group Outraged at Acquittal and Lenient Sentence for Sgt. Holcomb charged in the hazing and death of Pvt Danny Chen

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    July 31, 2012

    Its not over yet folks. Six more trials and one more sentencing remain. 

    Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55.

    Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

    Asian American Civil Rights Groups Angered by Acquittal and Lenient Sentence in Military Hazing Case

    FORT BRAGG, N.C.—Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55. Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

    “The verdict and sentencing recommendation in this case fly in the face of civil and human rights. It is absolutely appalling that following a campaign of humiliation due to anti-Asian bias by Sgt. Holcomb and others that led to...

  • To Lie or Not to Lie by Marilyn Tam

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    Marilyn having tea

     

    TO LIE OR NOT TO LIE 

    By Marilyn Tam

     

    Scott Thompson, the four months old CEO of Yahoo, was forced to resign because he lied on his resume. Worse, he lied about his lying and was found out. He denied that he inserted an extra degree into his resume, and then he blamed the recruiting firm he worked with for doing so. The recruiting firm, wanting to maintain their reputation, showed that it was Mr. Thompson who lied. Net result is that Mr. Thompson now has much more time to contemplate the efficacy of lying. 

                The question is, what are we willing to tolerate in our leaders’ behavior and reflectively in our own? Lying is bad. We’ve been told that ever since we were little. Or have we? Haven’t we also been told, “don’t say that, it will make them feel bad”, and there are such things as “white lies”, as compared to I guess black lies, which are bad.

                So we have grown up with some sense of expediency in what we call lying. Why do people lie? Is it because there is a perception that one can get ahead faster by lying than by telling the truth? Why would someone who is already well credentialed and respected feel the need to embellish his or her story? Is it a basic human nature to try to appear more than we are?

                Insecurities and fear that we are not as good or confident as we may appear to the world is a common trait. Almost everyone have self-doubts. Many years ago in a quote that is oft repeated, Sally Fields upon receiving her second Oscar in five years burst out saying, “I can't deny the fact that you like me, right now, you like me!” It shows that even performers who are on top of their game harbor great anxiety about their worthiness.

                The way to deal with the uncertainty is to own that it is part of you and continue to forge ahead. Over the years as I climbed the proverbial corporate ladder I’ve had many occasions to witness self-serving lies from people in power. I also was there to...