Lifestyle Spotlight

First Summit on Asian Stereotypes Urges Empowerment to Make Change

Posted by Suzanne Kai - on Sunday, 24 March 2013

Jeff Yang writer of
Little Tokyo - Los Angeles March 23, 2013 More than 200 people attended a summit yesterday in Los Angeles, provocatively titled "Beyond the Bad and the Ugly." The meeting was appropriately named as it took aim at the continued use of offensive images, ethnic slurs and stereotypical caricatures of Asian Americans in American media, and its impact on just about every aspect of American culture, politics, education and society. AsianConnections.com applauds Jeff Yang, Wall Street Journal...

Lifestyle

Are You Truly Free? by Marilyn Tam

Posted by Marilyn Tam on Tuesday, 07 August 2012

Are You Truly Free? by Marilyn Tam

Are You Truly Free?

By Marilyn Tam 


“In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.” ~Franklin D. Roosevelt

      

      We are fortunate that we in the USA can enjoy basic freedom as a given. The things that bind us are more internal – the mental restrictions and “shoulds” that shape our thinking and our decisions subconsciously.

      These subconscious constraints confine us to a fixed set of expectations and view of the world.

       It locks us from truly being able to soar to our highest potential, inner peace and happiness. How can we break free? This is a three-step process. First by recognizing that we are prisoners of our beliefs.

Whatever we believe about ourselves and the world is what we are going to experience. If you are holding negative thoughts like, “I’m not good enough” or “Bad things happen to me”, then that is what you are going to create in at least some aspects of your life.

       No one consciously choose to hold limiting beliefs, and yet we all do to some extent. Our childhood conditioning, whether from family, school, other influential figures in our lives, or the mass media, often contain some negative programming. People’s intentions may have been good, but fear and limitation are commonly used to keep young, rambunctious and questioning children, and indeed all people, in line. We often take on the constraints set for us as a children, to keep us from achieving our full potential later on in our lives.

       The second step is to examine your beliefs. Is it really true that you are only good at math, and/or that you can’t sing?...

AAPI Group Outraged at Acquittal and Lenient Sentence for Sgt. Holcomb charged in the hazing and death of Pvt Danny Chen

Posted by Suzanne Kai on Tuesday, 31 July 2012

AAPI Group Outraged at Acquittal and Lenient Sentence for Sgt. Holcomb charged in the hazing and death of Pvt Danny Chen

July 31, 2012

Its not over yet folks. Six more trials and one more sentencing remain. 

Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55.

Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

Asian American Civil Rights Groups Angered by Acquittal and Lenient Sentence in Military Hazing Case

FORT BRAGG, N.C.—Yesterday, a jury acquitted Sergeant Adam M. Holcomb—one of eight soldiers charged in the hazing and death of Pvt. Danny Chen—of negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, communicating a threat and violations of a military statute that prohibits hazing. Based on the jury’s recommendation, Sgt. Holcomb, who was convicted of two counts of maltreatment and one count of assault consummated by battery, may only receive a sentence of 30 days in prison, reduction of one rank, to specialist, and a fine of $1,181.55. Mee Moua, president and executive director of the Asian American Justice Center, a member of the Asian American Center for Advancing Justice, Tom Hayashi, executive director of OCA, and Elizabeth OuYang, OCA-NY president, issued the following statement.

“The verdict and sentencing recommendation in this case fly in the face of civil and human rights. It is absolutely appalling that following a campaign of...

AAPI Groups Urge Passage of Proposition 29 - California Cancer Research Act

Posted by AC Team on Saturday, 02 June 2012

AAPI Groups Urge Passage of Proposition 29 - California Cancer Research Act

 

June 1, 2012 - Press Release 

Elected Officials, Health Advocates & Community Leaders Denounce

Tobacco Company Lies About Prop. 29 & Urge AAPIs To Vote On Election Day

 

San Gabriel, CA – Asian American & Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (AANHPI) elected officials, community leaders, & health advocates convened a press conference to urge AANHPI voters to ignore misleading ads funded by the tobacco industry & vote for Prop. 29, the California Cancer Research Act, on June 5th, 2012. Advocates countered the misleading claims by the tobacco industry with the following facts:

 

The new $1 tobacco tax will save 104,000 lives; stop 228,000 kids from smoking; and generate approximately $735 million every year to support life-saving research and tobacco prevention programs. Prop. 29 will only increase taxes on those who smoke. The $1-per-pack increase is projected to prevent 225,000 Californian kids from becoming addicted smokers and prevent over 104,000 premature smoking-caused deaths, because many current smokers will quit.

Prop....

KABC-TV's David Ono's "Witness: The Power of a Picture" 40th Anniversary of "Napalm Girl"

Posted by David Ono ABC7 News LA on Friday, 01 June 2012

KABC-TV's David Ono's
Witness:  The Power of a Picture


A David Ono - ABC7 Eyewitness News Special

KABC-TV Los Angeles

 

Travel with ABC7 Eyewitness News Anchor, David Ono to Vietnam on the 40th Anniversary of the Pulitzer Prize winning photo “Napalm Girl” which shows an innocent 9-year-old whose clothes were burned off her body by napalm during the Vietnam War.

 

Airing Saturday, June 2, at 6:30 p.m. PST

 

 

Highlights of David Ono's powerful documentary are online at KABC-TV's website. The documentary initially aired on KABC-TV June 2, at 630 p.m. PST. 

A photograph allows us to deeply examine a split second in time.  It’s an opportunity to freeze the world and absorb all the emotions, actions, consequences that are attached to that moment.     Photographer Nick Ut’s “Napalm Girl” did exactly that.  We saw an innocent child whose clothes were burned off her body, running naked, in seething pain.  Children, caught in the cross fire, would forever have an indelible face - Kim Phuc. 
That moment changed us, providing a sobering clarity to...

Supporters urging passage of H.R. 5638 "Service Member Anti-Hazing Act" head to Washington with 9000 cards honoring U.S. Army Pvt. Danny Chen

Posted by Suzanne Kai on Tuesday, 29 May 2012

Supporters urging passage of H.R. 5638

 

Update May 28, 2012

May 24, 2012 would have been Private Danny Chen's 20th birthday. 

After weeks of hazing, physical and mental abuse and racial taunting as documented in his personal diary, U.S. Army Private Danny Chen was found dead of an apparent suicide on October 3, 2011 in Afghanistan. 

More than 9,000 cards honoring bullying victim Danny Chen have been collected and are on their way to Washington D.C. by supporters of anti-bullying legislation of H.R. 5638, the "Service Member Anti-Hazing Act." The bill has passed the House on Friday, May 25, and now waits for Senate approval. 

 

Update April 11, 2012

Army Courts-Martial in Connection with U.S. Private Danny Chen Moved to US

The U.S. military announced today that the trials of the eight U.S. soldiers implicated in the death of 19 year old U.S. Army Private Danny Chen have been moved to U.S. soil. The trials will be held at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, if senior military officials decide courts-martial are warranted. Fort Bragg's commanders have accepted jurisdiction in the...