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2021 Oscar and Emmy Nominated CRIP CAMP: A DISABILITY REVOLUTION - Documentary

Posted by Suzanne Kai - on Sunday, 20 September 2020

2021 Oscar and Emmy Nominated CRIP CAMP: A DISABILITY REVOLUTION - Documentary
Hollywood September 20, 2021 (updated November 11, 2021 / February 1, 2022) James LeBrecht on his Facebook page disclosed that he has been ill for months and is now doing alot better and should be back 'to a normal' in a couple of months. We wish you a speedy recovery James!  By Suzanne Joe Kai With the Television Academy and CBS announcing that its 2021 Emmy Awards Show would be the 'most inclusive ever,' as reported by critic Kristen Lopez for...

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NYIFF To Screen ‘Saving Face,’ Oscar-Winning Pakistani Documentary, As Part of its Stellar 12th Anniversary Line-up of Films, Festival Runs May 23-27 at Tribeca Cinemas

Posted by Lia Chang on Wednesday, 07 March 2012

NYIFF To Screen ‘Saving Face,’ Oscar-Winning Pakistani Documentary, As Part of its Stellar 12th Anniversary Line-up of Films, Festival Runs May 23-27 at Tribeca Cinemas

(New York, NY—March 5, 2012) Saving Face,Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and Daniel Junge’s Oscar-winning short documentary about the plight of two Pakistani women who were victims of acid attacks, is one of more than 50 hand-selected films that will wow audiences at the 12th annual New York Indian Film Festival (NYIFF). Presented by the Indo-American Arts Council (IAAC), NYIFF is scheduled from May 23 to 27 at Tribeca Cinemas in lower Manhattan. Formerly known as the IAAC and MIAAC Film Festivals, NYIFF has premiered some of the most well-known South Asian and foreign films, including Oscar-winning Slumdog Millionaire, Bride and Prejudice, Monsoon Wedding, The Namesake, and several others. Some of the highlights of this year’s festival include:

May 23rd - Opening night red carpet screening at Paris Theatre & Gala Benefit at Essex House
May 24th – Industry Panels at Tribeca Cinemas
May 24th to 27th – NYIFF Screenings, post-screening events, parties, special events
Script-writing workshops
One minute cell phone films by NYU Tisch Film & TV students on Bollywood Music
Nightly networking parties at lounges around New York City
May 25th – Centerpiece screening & discussion: Tribute to Dev Anand –Hum Dono Rangeen
May 26th – Sidebar: Shyam Benegal Retrospective followed by post-screening discussion with director. Mamoo (1994), Sardari Begum (1996), and Zubeidaa (2001) – the...

National Cherry Blossom Festival Invites Public to Stand with Japan on March 24

Posted by Lia Chang on Wednesday, 23 March 2011

Washington Monument and Cherry Blossom Trees in Washington D.C. © Lia Chang

The 2011 National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, DC, which runs from March 26-April 10 commemorates the 99th anniversary of the gift of the cherry blossom trees and the enduring friendship between the United States and Japan. This year’s festival features three spectacular weekends and daily events highlighting traditional and contemporary Japanese arts and culture, natural beauty, and community spirit.

The National Cherry Blossom Festival is sponsoring a fundraising event called Stand with Japan at the Washington Monument on March 24, 2011. Meet at the Sylvan Theater, 15th Street & Independence Avenue, SW at 6:30pm and join others who are gathering to reflect and participate in the walk around the Tidal Basin, where the cherry blossom trees, gifted to Washington, DC from Tokyo in 1912, have stood the test of time for 99 years. The relationship with Japan is at the heart of the Festival, and the evening of hope and perseverance occurs before the 16-day celebration begins on Saturday, March 26. All donations will go directly to the American Red Cross and their Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami fund.

A ful list of Festival participants and partners holding events to benefit the fund can be found at www.nationalcherryblossomfestival.org

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William Wong weighs in on what Jeremy Lin may have had to do to get his 'game on' and instead of smashing stereotypes he confirms a few

Posted by AC Team on Sunday, 26 February 2012

William Wong weighs in on what Jeremy Lin may have had to do to get his 'game on' and instead of smashing stereotypes he confirms a few

Update:

February 27, 2012

Two award-winning writers weigh in on the Jeremy Lin story. 

Author and former Wall Street Journal writer William Wong reports on what Jeremy Lin may have had to do to get his 'game on' and how that confirms a few stereotypes, in his fifth "Linsanity" column.

Wong writes, "In at least two articles, sportswriters in the San Francisco Bay Area and New York have given us a fuller picture of how Lin — with the help of coaches and trainers — transformed himself from a skinny kid with an awkward jump shot into one of the most exciting point guards in the NBA, after graduating in 2010 as a star player at Harvard (definitely NOT an NBA “farm team” the way lesser universities are), but ignored in the NBA draft and getting cut by two other NBA teams."

"The essence of these stories is that Lin has worked extremely hard over the past 18 months to improve his game — gaining weight and bulk, refining his jump shot, learning the fine points of point-guard play. In doing so, Jeremy Lin, instead of smashing stereotypes, is confirming a few stereotypes of Chinese Americans/Asian Americans — of being diligent hard workers, and smart."

William Wong's full article at SFGate.com

AsianConnections' columnist, author, and former senior editor of Rolling Stone magazine Ben Fong-Torres says Jeremy Lin's success is a dream come true - his dream, as well as the dream of countless other Asian American kids.


 

Related:

Update: 

February 23, 2012:

Working Theater Presents Staged Reading of Chay Yew’s Visible Cities at The Studio Theatre on Theatre Row

Posted by Lia Chang on Wednesday, 23 March 2011

  On Monday, March 21, 2011, Working Theater presents a staged reading of Visible Cities by Chay Yew, directed by Mike Donahue, at The Studio Theatre on Theatre Row, 410 W 42nd St. (between 9th & 10th Aves in New York. The cast features Joanna Adler, Josh Barrett, Jackie Chung, Jennifer Ikeda, Natalie Martin, Quentin Maré, Orville Mendoza, Steve Park and Gordana Rashovich.

Chay Yew’s plays include Porcelain, A Language of Their Own, RED, Wonderland, Question 27 Question 28, A Distant Shore, 17, America and A Beautiful Country. His other work includes adaptations, A Winter People (based on Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard) and Lorca’s The House of Bernarda Alba, and a musical Long Season. His plays have been produced at the Public Theatre, Royal Court Theatre (London), Mark Taper Forum, Manhattan Theatre Club, Long Wharf Theatre, La Jolla Playhouse, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Intiman Theatre, Wilma Theatre, Studio Theatre, Portland Center Stage, East West Players, Cornerstone Theatre Company, Perseverance Theatre, Dad’s Garage, La Mama (Melbourne, Australia), Singapore Repertory Theatre and TheatreWorks Singapore, amongst others.

He is also the recipient of the London Fringe Award for Best Playwright and Best Play, George and Elisabeth Marton Playwriting Award, GLAAD Media Award, Asian Pacific Gays and Friends’ Community Visibility Award, Made in America Award, AEA/SAG/AFTRA 2004 Diversity Honor, Robert Chesley Award and an OBIE Award for...

Another controversial broadcast by ESPN titled "Has Society Become Oversensitive About Race?"

Posted by AC Team on Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Another controversial broadcast by ESPN titled

Update

February 29, 2012

The blogosphere an social media erupted again - This time over a conversation about race and Jeremy Lin between ESPN.com's Lynn Hoppes, Stephen A. Smith and Skip Bayless.

Just take a look at the running comments about ESPN's commentary on the video replay page online at http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=7624785

The conversation was titled by ESPN "Has Society Become Oversensitive with Race?"

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