Lifestyle Spotlight

The Year of Sheltering Dangerously By Ben Fong-Torres

Posted by Ben Fong-Torres - on Wednesday, 31 March 2021

The Year of Sheltering Dangerously By Ben Fong-Torres
The Year of Sheltering Dangerously By Ben Fong-Torres   Well, hasn’t THIS been a fun 365? As we approached the anniversary of the shelter-in-place orders for the San Francisco Bay Area, on March 16, I thought of some of the changes we’ve been through.  In February, our calendar was packed with restaurant dinners and a large, loud gathering at Harbor Villa, saluting our friend, the civil rights attorney Dale Minami. And there was my 24th time as co-anchor of the...

Lifestyle

Yale Admissions Officer Scott Clark Shares Insight into the Admissions process wit AC's Marissa Becker

Posted by Marissa Beker on Tuesday, 22 November 2005

'Tis the season for submitting last minute college applications. AsianConnections' Marissa Becker sits down for a rare interview with Yale Admissions Officer Scott Clark.

As students are putting the final touches on their college admissions applications, Yale Admissions Officer Scott Clark shares insight on the complex selection process in a rare interview with AsianConnections' Marissa Becker.

Marissa What advice can you share for students applying to college today?

Scott: The biggest piece of advice that I would have for students is just to relax as they go through this for several reasons.

For one, getting your heart rate up is unhealthy and nobody wants to see that.

Two, it ends up being counter productive for your goals, as far as getting into schools and doing well, being happy and being successful because youll be making choices based on anxiety, based on status, what have you, and those are all the wrong reasons to make your decisions.

And so, were very concerned about all the anxiety thats coming into play these days and we really want to just see students emotionally divest a little bit, not get so wrapped up into getting into the most prestigious college but rather spend their time finding the college where they think theyll be happy and where they think they will be successful.

Your self esteem, your self worth has absolutely no business being wrapped up in this because if most students dont get in, then you can just think to yourself of actually being in good...

What's in store for the Year of the Wood Rooster?

Posted by Angi Ma Wong on Thursday, 13 January 2005

Feng Shui expert and author Angi Ma Wong provides your Year of the Wood Rooster astrology forecast.

After the unpredictable Year of the Monkey with its horrendous surprise ending with the Asian earthquake and tsunami, most of us are ready for the new year of the Rooster which begins on February 9, 2005. The element of wood remains above that of metal during this year, portending a continuation of disharmonious relations on the international front but with hope. Because wood is more flexible, there will be fewer serious confrontations than last year and more opportunity for resolution.

During this year, the most dreaded of the 3 Afflictions, the 5 Yellows, resides in the NW so if your front entrance is facing 292.6 degrees to 337.5 degrees, find and use another entrance into your home so as not to activate this direction. Hang your pagoda windchime outside close to the front door for protection from serious illness, accidents and calamities to your household.

Do not face West when you are working this year of the Rooster (even if you are a West group person and it is one of your four best directions) where the Grand Duke Jupiter rests. To do so will only bring frustation and a feeling that you are struggling but not making progress. For East group people, it is good to face East as you will have the support of the Grand Duke behind you. The 3 Killings is in the East this year and you can face it, but not have this direction behind you.

The Rooster symbolizes the liver,...

Swimming to New Orleans - One Man's Search for Friends and Family

Posted by AC Team on Friday, 09 September 2005

First-person narrative, by Nick Glassman, Sep 07, 2005
NCM - Pacific News Service

Editor's Note: A SF Bay Area man goes to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and finds a war zone of floating bodies, armed and angry survivors and threatening policemen.

I just returned this past weekend from my first trip to Louisiana since Katrina. It's beyond what you can imagine -- it's hell on Earth.

First-person narrative by Nick Glassman, Sep 07, 2005
Pacific News Service - NCM

Editor's Note: A Bay Area man goes to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina and finds a war zone of floating bodies, armed and angry survivors and threatening policemen.

I just returned this past weekend from my first trip to Louisiana since Katrina. It's beyond what you can imagine -- it's hell on Earth.

I flew into Baton Rouge, which sits about 80 miles northwest of New Orleans, and the city is destroyed, but not by the storm. There are hundreds of thousands of refugees from New Orleans in Baton Rouge. People are camping on the side of the roads, in their cars if they have them, and all over the LSU campus. The first thing you notice is how outraged everyone is.

The people of Baton Rouge don't want us here, and you can't blame them. There seems to be no plan for the New Orleaneans once they are dropped off in Baton Rouge, and locals are confused, horrified or worse. They know this is potentially a permanent situation, or at least the way it will be for the next several months. It's safe to say they're as...

Tips to Keep Your Mind in Top Shape

Posted by Lia Chang on Monday, 05 December 2005

Have you ever misplaced your keys and wondered if you were losing your mind? According to the Mayo Clinic, just when youre old enough to be considered wise about the ways of the world, some days its awfully hard to find your glasses.

Have you ever misplaced your keys and wondered if you were losing your mind?

According to the Mayo Clinic, just when youre old enough to be considered wise about the ways of the world, some days its awfully hard to find your glasses.

As you age, some brain cells may deteriorate or function less efficiently, potentially affecting your speed of mental processing and ability to retrieve information rapidly. Yet many factors besides aging affect mental ability. Depression, stress, sleep disorders, poor health and certain medications are among the most common.

The November issue of Mayo Clinic Womens HealthSource covers healthy choices to help keep your mind and body in top form:

Exercise your mind. An active brain produces new connections between nerve cells that allow cells to communicate with one another. To challenge your mind, try taking a class or engaging in a new hobby. Other activities that could help include reading, volunteering and staying connected with friends.

Stay physically active. Exercise increases blood flow to all parts of your body, including your brain and might promote cell growth there. To reap the most benefits, exercise at least 30 minutes a day most days of the week.

Eat fruits and vegetables. Oranges, berries,...

Tea Flavonoids Act as Potent Antioxidants

Posted by Lia Chang on Tuesday, 13 December 2005

Tea flavonoids act as potent antioxidants and have been shown to induce cancer cell death and growth while bolstering the body's immune system defenses against the disease.

According to a study published in the latest issue of Archives of Internal Medicine*, black tea consumption is inversely associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. This population-based study followed over 61,000 Swedish women aged 40-76 over a 15-year period, and noted a dose-response relationship between tea consumption and incidence of ovarian cancer. Compared to women who reported not drinking tea, those who drank two or more cups per day had a 46 percent lower risk of developing ovarian cancer.

The Iowa Women's Cohort study, conducted in the U.S., also suggests that weekly consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer.

"The size of this study helps build a case that tea flavonoids have the ability to help protect against cancer in a varieties of ways," said Douglas Balentine, Ph.D., Director Nutrition Sciences Unilever North America. "Tea flavonoids act as potent antioxidants and have been shown to induce cancer cell death and growth while bolstering the body's immune system defenses against the disease."

Cancer is a multifactorial disease, but it is clear that diet can play a role in helping to reduce the risk of many types of cancer.

* Larsson SC, Wolk A. Tea Consumption and Ovarian Cancer Risk in a Population-Based Cohort.
Arch Intern Med. Dec 12/26 2005;165.